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Interview with Linda Ashok


Linda-AshokLinda Ashok was one of the 25 feature poets selected by the Prakriti Foundation for The Hindu Lit for Life, 2014. Her poetry has appeared or forthcoming in various literary journals including the Mascara Literary Review, The McNeese Review and the Big Bridge Anthology of Contemporary Indian Poetry. She reviews poetry for The Rumpus and manages The Poetry Mail. A brief on Linda can be found on Lit Hub’s #ActualAsianPoets. Linda tweets at @thebluelimit.

Wale: Can you briefly describe the role of imagery in poetry?

Linda: Imagery does to my poems “what spring does to the cherry trees”. And much like spring, imagery in poetry is responsible for its freshness, vitality and the spirit to obsess the readers.

Wale: Beautiful! What I enjoy most in your poetry is your ‘visual mode of expression’. Do you think your early exposure to paintings and other visual arts is responsible for this?


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Dr. Craig’s 12-Step Program for White Poets Contemplating Ethnic Fraud

Craig Santos Perez for the Internet Wins re: cultural and racial appropriation!~

Craig Santos Perez

Are you a white poet writing mediocre poems that are constantly rejected? Do you feel cheated out of your entitled publications? Do you find yourself desperately reaching for an ethnic pseudonym?

If you answered yes, Dr. Craig’s 12-step program is designed to help you write like poets of color without committing ethnic fraud. This program is guaranteed or your privilege back!

Step 1: Read. You’ve probably spent most of your life reading white poets. Spend a year reading only poets of color. You will learn how ethnic writing is diverse and exceeds all stereotypes and expectations.

Step 2: Listen. A major thread of ethnic poetry is spoken word. Try listening to one poetry video every day. Hear our voices.

Step 3: Attend. If there is a poetry event in your town featuring poets of color, support the community and bring a dish just in case it’s a potluck.  

Step 4:…

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Metta Sáma on Activism, Writing, Teaching, and Blogging

“We, as POC, spend so much time worrying about grace and mercy, that we convince ourselves that the racisms enacted upon us aren’t as bad as we thought they were. Why spend that time trying to be gracious and merciful to your attackers? Come at them hard, come at them fiercely, come at them with all of your power. That, too, is love. Love for the self. Love for the community. Love for the generations to come after you.”